NFPA 2112 Inspection System for Garment Manufacturing

$147.00

The NFPA 2112 Inspection System for Garment Manufacturing is based upon the 2018 standard, which applies a quality system that is similar to MIL-I-45208.

SKU: 1205 Category:

Description

Click here for PDF demo NFPA 2112 Inspection System for Garment Manufacturing – opens in new tab/page

The QMS kit to adopt the NFPA 2112 Inspection System for Garment Manufacturing includes the following documents:

Policies and Procedures:

  • Quality Manual
  • Calibration Procedure
  • Corrective Action Procedure
  • Document Control Procedure
  • Nonconformances Procedure
  • Production Procedure
  • Proposal Development and Contract Review Procedure
  • Purchasing Procedure
  • Recall Procedure
  • Receiving Procedure
  • Records Control Procedure

Forms and Work Instructions:

  • Folder Setup for Dropbox (Customer accessible folders for QMS docs and records)
  • Approved Supplier List
  • Calibration Procedure Forms
  • Change Order Template
  • Change Order #101
  • Contract Review Forms
  • Corrective Action Request
  • Data List (Drawing Tree)
  • Good Material Dot
  • Good Material Tag
  • Inspection Instruction Template
  • Inspection Record
  • Inspection Report
  • Inspection Summary
  • Inspector Stamp Log
  • Job Sheet (Work Order)
  • Management Meeting Report
  • Nonconformance Report
  • Nonconformance Report Log
  • Preservation, Packaging and Packing Instructions
  • Procedure Template
  • Production and Inspection Test Record
  • Purchase Order
  • Purchase Requisition
  • QC Tags
  • Recall Distribution List
  • Recall Letter
  • Recall Register
  • Recall Return Response Form
  • Receiving Inspection Instructions
  • Receiving Inspection Record
  • Receiving Log
  • Routing Ticket
  • Supplier Evaluation
  • Supplier Performance Rating Spreadsheet
  • Supplier Quality Requirements
  • Supplier Survey
  • Traceability Work Instruction
  • Traveler Form
  • Traveler Template
  • Work Instruction Template

Reprinted from osha.gov:

There are safety requirements in many industries that mandate the outer layer of employee safety clothing be fire resistant and flame retardant under certain conditions – for instance, in the Utilities industry, when:

  • An electric arc could ignite flammable material in the work area that, in turn, could ignite the employee’s clothing.
  • Molten metal or electric arcs from faulted conductors in the work area could ignite the employee’s clothing.
  • The employee is exposed to contact with energized circuit parts operating at more than 600 volts.

Hazards still may be present if a prohibited material is worn as one of multiple layers of clothing. If the layer of clothing made from a prohibited material (acetate, nylon, polyester, rayon) is worn as the outside layer of clothing, there is a hazard that the fabric could ignite and burn.

Consider adopting the NFPA 2112 Inspection System for Garment Manufacturing if your Company elects to produce flame-resistant and/or fire-retardant fabric or clothing.

If a layer of clothing made from a prohibited material is worn as a middle or inside layer of clothing, and if enough heat passed through the outer layer(s), there is a hazard that the fabric could ignite (assuming sufficient air flow).

If a layer of clothing made from a prohibited material is worn (acetate, nylon, polyester, rayon) as the inside layer of clothing, there is a hazard that the fabric could melt in contact with the employee’s skin, which would cause a burn injury. The employer must be able to demonstrate that a prohibited material worn by an employee does not cause a hazardous condition.

Clothing made from 100% cotton or wool may be acceptable if its weight is appropriate for the flame and electric arc conditions to which a worker could be exposed. As heat levels increase, these materials will not melt, but they can ignite and continue to burn. The amount of heat required to ignite these materials is dependent upon a number of factors, including the weight, texture, weave, and color of the material. This type of clothing does not comply with the “269” standard if it can ignite (and continue to burn) under the electric arc and flame exposure conditions found at the workplace.

Employers need to make a determination of whether or not the clothing worn by the worker is acceptable under the conditions to which he or she could be exposed.

nfpa 2112 inspection system for garment manufacturing

Image from OSHA website that illustrates the need for flame resistant clothing as part of a robust PPE program.

If OSHA inspects a facility that uses highly hazardous chemicals that includes flash fire hazards and the employer has not conducted a hazard assessment to determine PPE needs with respect to the hazard, and the employer has not developed operating or mechanical integrity procedures that require employees to wear flame-resistant clothing to protect themselves when they are near the flash fire hazard, the employer may be cited for 1910.132(a), 1910.132(d), 1910.119(f)(1)(iii)(B) and/or 1910.119(j)(2).

If the employer has conducted the hazard assessment required by 1910.132(d) and has determined a need for flame-resistant clothing and has incorporated that requirement into their operating and mechanical integrity procedures but employees do not wear the flame-resistant clothing, the employer may be cited for 1910.132(a), 1910.119(f)(1) and/or 1910.119(j)(2) for failing to implement their procedures.

FR clothing is acceptable with respect to the OSHA 1910.269 apparel requirements.

Adopt the low complexity NFPA 2112 Inspection System for Garment Manufacturing, which is comparable to the MIL-I-45208 Inspection System.